UCHD, Protecting Your Health.

 

Wednesday, 04 September 2013 20:31

Home Canning

Did you know  food safety recommendations change? 

         No one wants their doctor to write them a prescription from the 70's. Treatments for diseases such as diabetes and cancer have dramatically changed in the last forty years due to advances in science and technology.

Similarly, our knowledge of food safety has also advanced over the past few years. To be safe don’t use the same canning method your grandmother used.

  •  Always use current, up-to-date and scientifically tested canning techniques (outdated cookbooks and methods such as boiling or hot water canners can be deadly, since, they don’t protect against all foodborne illnesses)
  • Use pressure cookers with low-acid home canned foods to protect against botulism
  • High-acid foods such as fruits and tomatoes are safe to process in boiling water
  • Always inspect your jars before eating and never taste a jar’s contents to check for spoilage

 

Read below for more home canning food safety. 

You can also check out Home Food Preservation tips at the Ohio State University

 and http://ohioline.osu.edu/lines/food.html for additional fact sheets, cooking guides, and additional resources.

Tuesday, 03 September 2013 18:42

Chill

Refrigerate food promptly. 2 hours max out of the fridge!

 

Storage Times for the Refrigerator and Freezer

These short but safe time limits for home-refrigerated foods will keep them from spoiling or becoming dangerous to eat. The guidelines for freezer storage are for quality only. Frozen foods remain safe indefinitely.

For storage times for eggs and foods made with eggs, see Egg Storage Chart.

Food Storage times

Tuesday, 03 September 2013 18:06

Food Safety for Food Operators

Banner-Ad

September is National Food Safety Month

      The Union County Health Department is joining forces with the National Restaurant Association as well as the Ad Council and the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service, in partnership with the FDA and CDC to increase awareness of food safety in both food service establishments and homes in Union County. Each year, 1 in 6 Americans or gets sick by consuming contaminated foods or beverages with the majority of illnesses being preventable.  Foodborne illnesses can cause flu-like symptoms to hospitalization or even death. Here at UCHD we work hard to prevent and respond to food safety issues

        Our goal is to work together with you, the food operators, to decrease the rate of foodborne illness and the number of foodborne outbreaks in our backyard. We hope you join us by reinforcing safe food handling practices and procedures with your staff as well as taking advantage of the many educational opportunities available to you this month and throughout the year.

The National Restaurant Association offers free online training activities and posters that you can access through our website along with many other resources.  Look out for more information coming your way as we campaign for good personal hygiene, prevent cross-contamination, control time and temperature, and encourage proper cleaning and sanitizing procedures.

Remember food safety is about working together to keep everyone healthy and happy. We at UCHD want to collaborate and work with managers and operators for better results. ‘Cause no one wants foodborne bacteria as a dinner guest!  

Food Safety Honor Roll check here for information on our new program encouraging/rewarding establishments that practice food safety and train employees in safe food handling and procedures.

 

Need a license? Check here for information on how to apply and what is needed.

Want to know what the rules are? Follow this link to find out along with other resources for food operators. 

National Restaurant Association

Tuesday, 03 September 2013 16:03

Food Safety

Food Safety is Important

 1 in 6  people gets food poisoning. CDC Vital Signs™:  www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns

Union County Health Department (UCHD) takes food safety seriously. The CDC estimates that each year, 1 in 6 Americans gets sick by eating or drinking contaminated foods or drinks. That adds up to 48 million people resulting in roughly 128,000 hospitalizations and 3,000 deaths from food poisoning, also called foodborne illnesses every year! The majority of foodborne illnesses are preventable and harmful effects range from flu-like symptoms to hospitalization or even death.

Click here for Food Safety for Operators

Here at Union County Health Department we work hard to prevent and respond to food safety issues. 

Because no one wants foodborne bacteria as a dinner guest!

 

Protect those you love by following safe food practices at home:

CLEAN, SEPARATE, COOK, and CHILL

FoodSafe Box

  

Foodsafety.gov logo for "Clean"CLEAN: Wash hands and surfaces often.

Illness-causing bacteria can survive in many places around your kitchen, including your hands, utensils, and cutting boards.

  • Wash hands the right way—for 20 seconds with soap and running water. Be sure to scrub the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails.
  • Wash surfaces and utensils after each use. Rinsing utensils, countertops, and cutting boards with water won’t do enough to stop bacteria from spreading. Clean utensils and small cutting boards with hot, soapy water. Clean surfaces and cutting boards with a bleach solution.
  • Wash fruits and veggies—but not meat, poultry, or eggs. Even if you plan to peel fruits and veggies, it’s important to wash them first because bacteria can spread from the outside to the inside as you cut or peel them.

 

  

Foodsafety.gov logo for "Separate"SEPARATE: Don't cross-contaminate.

Even after you’ve cleaned your hands and surfaces thoroughly, raw meat, poultry, seafood, and eggs can still spread illness-causing bacteria to ready-to-eat foods—unless you keep them separate.

 

 

Foodsafety.gov logo for "Cook"COOK: Cook to the right temperature.

While many people think they can tell when food is “done” simply by checking its color and texture, there’s no way to be sure it’s safe without following a few important but simple steps.

  • Use a food thermometer. Make sure food reaches its safe minimum cooking temperature. For example, internal temperatures should be 145°F for whole meats (allowing the meat to rest for 3 minutes before carving or eating), 160°F for ground meats, and 165°F for all poultry. Eggs should be cooked until the yolk is firm.
  • During meal times, while food is being served and eaten, keep it hot (at 140 ˚F or above). After meals are over, refrigerate leftover food quickly.
  • Microwave food thoroughly (to 165 ˚F). 
 

 

Foodsafety.gov logo for "Chill"CHILL: Refrigerate promptly.

Illness-causing bacteria can grow in many foods within two hours unless you refrigerate them. (During the summer heat, cut that time down to one hour.)

 

 
  

woman reporting foodborne illness on phoneREPORT: If you believe you or someone you know became ill from eating a certain food, please contact your local health department.

Health departments are an important part of the food safety system which rely on calls from concerned citizens. You can be an important part of discovering what foods made you and others sick.

  • If a public health official contacts you to find out more about an illness you had, your cooperation is important. Be willing to be interviewed about the foods you ate before you got sick; share your store receipts and give permission for stores to share the list of food you purchased from their store; and allow investigators to come to your home to collect any leftover food you may have.
  • In public health investigations, it can be as important to talk to healthy people as to ill people. Even if you are not ill, be willing to be interviewed about the foods you ate during a certain period of time.
  • REMEMBER: It's not usually the last meal you ate that made you sick. Foodborne pathogens usually require incubation times of 12-72 hours. 

For more information on preventing foodborne illnesses, please visit FoodSafety.gov, the federal gateway for food safety information.

Content provided by the CDC and FoodSafety.gov

 

 

*This September, UCHD is joining forces with forces with the National Restaurant Association, the Ad Council and the USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service, in partnership with the FDA and CDC to increase awareness of food safety in both food service establishments and homes in Union County.

 Look out for promotional ads throughout the community targeting consumers and food operators to be mindful of safe food handling practices and procedures. Continue to check our website as we keep you updated on ways to reduce your family's risk of foodborne illness.

 

 

Who's at Risk for Foodborne Illness- Know who in your family has the greatest danger of foodborne illness and take extra precautions. 

Produce- An apple a day keeps the doctor away..." be mindful of safe food practices when you enjoy your favorite fruit or vegetable. 

Home Canning- Up to date procedures  to ensure a high-quality, safe product that you and your family can enjoy.

 

 

 

 

Tuesday, 09 October 2012 13:43

Epidural Steroid Injection Health Alert

Ohio Contacting Patients Who Received Epidural Steroid Injection
The Ohio Department of Health (ODH) released the names of healthcare facilities in the state that received a recalled epidural steroid injection. Local health departments and facilities have been working diligently to contact any patient who received the treatment which is most frequently used to treat back pain.
 
Facilities which received the recalled product have been contacted by their local health department. At this time, FDA has notified ODH that the following clinics received the above recalled medication:
 
• BKC Pain Specialists, 1065 Delaware Ave., Marion, OH 43302
• Cincinnati Pain Management, 8261 Cornell Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45249
• Marion Pain Clinic, 1199 Delaware Ave., Marion, OH 43302
• Ortho-Spine Rehab Center, 7211 Sawmill Rd. Suite 101, Dublin, OH 43016
 
“It’s very important that we reach out to those who had the treatment because symptoms are subtle and can be overlooked,” said Dr. Ted Wymyslo, Director of ODH. “As we look harder, it is possible that we will uncover cases. We want to get these patients connected with treatment to prevent more serious consequences.”
 
Patients who received a steroid injection, and are experiencing symptoms such as a new or worsening headache, fever, neck stiffness, or pain at the injection site, should contact their healthcare provider to determine if they have received one of the recalled products and to receive further evaluation.
 
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are coordinating a multi-state investigation of meningitis among patients who had received epidural steroid injection. At least five deaths have been reported. Fungal meningitis, which is not transmitted from person to person, is suspected to be the cause of the outbreak. A potentially contaminated product may be the source of the infection, though investigation into the exact source is still ongoing.
 
Interim data show that all infected patients received injection with preservative-free methylprednisolone acetate (80mg/ml) prepared by the New England Compounding Center, located in Framingham, MA. The lots of medication that were used on infected patients have been recalled. The lots are:
• Methylprednisolone Acetate (PF) 80 mg/ml Injection, Lot #05212012@68, BUD 11/17/2012
• Methylprednisolone Acetate (PF) 80 mg/ml Injection, Lot #06292012@26, BUD 12/26/2012
• Methylprednisolone Acetate (PF) 80 mg/ml Injection, Lot #08102012@51, BUD 2/6/2013
Clinicians are also requested to report any suspected adverse events following use of these products to FDA's MedWatch program at 1-800-332-1088 www.fda.gov/medwatch or contact their local health department.
 
 
*Information taken from October 5, 2012 press release from the Ohio Department of Health.
Click here for the latest guidance for healthcare providers and more infromation on this recall and outbreak from the Centers for Disease Control.
Monday, 16 July 2012 19:23

What to Avoid at Garage Sales

Garages sales, yard sales and thrift stores can be full of great bargains. You can find all kinds of trinkets and treasures, but there are some items you should be weary of when searching for that amazing summer deal. Here is a public health perspective on six popular garage sale items.

1) Child Car Seats- Three public health cautions on this item: 1) Expiration, 2) History & 3) Recall. Many people do not know car seats have expiration dates. The expiration date is typically six or seven years for new seats and ten years for older seats. Expired car seats may not meet current safety standards and should not be used. You can find the expiration date stamped in the plastic on the back or bottom of a car seat or on its model number label. Even if a car seat is not expired, it may have been in an accident.  Most car seat manufacturers do not allow a car seat to be used after any type of accident, even if there is no visible damage. A final consideration is whether the seat has been recalled. Do not buy a car seat unless you are sure it is not recalled, this is true of newer seats as well as older seats. 

2) Bicycle or Motorcycle Helmets- As is the case for most safety equipment, it is important to know whether the item has ever been in a crash. Not all accidents result in visible damage to safety equipment. When you buy a second-hand helmet or other safety equipment, you run the risk of relying on a piece of damaged equipment to protect you. 

3) Cribs- There have been many recalls over the years on cribs. Some older cribs may have chipped paint or splintered wood. Additionally, older cribs may not meet safety standards now in place, such as spacing requirements between slats. Also pass on stuffed animals, bumper pads, and other soft items for the crib. Pediatricians now recommend infant sleep environments be kept free of soft items, which have been linked to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).

4)  Mattresses & Bed Frames- With bed bugs making their presence well known, use caution when buying mattresses and bed frames. Bed bugs can hide in very small crevices and are extremely hard to get rid of once they've made your home their home. Mattresses also can be full of mites, dandruff, sloughed skin and other remnants of their previous owner. 

5) Couches and Other Fabric Furniture- Same as with mattresses, these could be home to bed bugs. Before you buy check every seam for evidence of bed bug "spotting" (brown, black or reddish brown spots of dried fecal matter). 

6) Shoes- Adult shoes actually form to your foot. Thus, wearing someone else's broken in shoes could result in foot, joint and back pain. Make sure you check the sole and the insert of the shoe for wear and pressure marks.   

 

The bottom line when buying second-hand products is to think about the unknown. You don't know its history, how it has been treated, or how much it was used. This is especially true when considering baby items or safety products. When considering purchasing these types of items it is important to remember EXPIRATION, RECALL & HISTORY. For more information on recalled products visit the Consumer Product Safety Commission.


Wednesday, 11 July 2012 13:16

Open Burning

Summer time can often see an increase in open burning. Before igniting an outdoor fire, it is important to know Ohio's open burning regulations. Open burning is regulated by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. Open burning can not only adversely affect air quality, it can also increase the risk for wild fires. 

Below is a pdf of Ohio EPA's open burning brochure.

icon open burn regulations

Thursday, 03 May 2012 17:47

Summer Safety

Summer brings warmth, sunshine, flowers, and a freshness to help us shake off the icy grip of winter. But the heat, bugs, and sun also bring many health and safety concerns. See all the tips below to ensure you safely have fun in the sun this summer.

Outdoor Spring & Summer Safety
Sun Safety
Extreme Heat
Swimming Safety

 

Spring and Summer Outdoor Safety

The return of warmer temperatures brings the opportunity for freedom, relaxation, exploration, and being closer to nature. Whether you're relaxing in the backyard, turning up your garden, hitting the pool, or exploring the great outdoors, here are some ways to help keep you and your family healthy this spring and summer.


Beware of Bugs

Photo: Woman applying insect repellentWarmer temperatures aren't just attractive to people, but to mosquitoes, ticks, and fleas. Mosquitoes can transmit West Nile virus , St. Louis encephalitisvirus , eastern equine encephalitis virus and even dengue; ticks can transmitLyme disease and other serious infections; and fleas can transmit plague.

To prevent these illnesses, use an appropriate insect and tick repellent and apply it properly. Prime mosquito-biting hours are usually from dusk to dawn, but ticks are out at all times. Young ticks are so small that they can be difficult to see, but both young and adult ticks hungrily look to animals and sometimes people to bite.

To keep ticks at a distance, avoid tick-infested areas (especially places with leaf-litter and high grasses) and use repellent containing 20% DEET. If it’s primarily mosquitoes that are the problem, CDC recommends repelling them with products that contain DEET, picaridin, IR3535 or oil of lemon eucalyptus. You can also treat clothing with permethrin (which protects through several washings) or purchase clothing that is pre-treated with permethrin. Always follow the directions on repellent packaging.

After coming indoors, shower as soon as possible and check your body for ticks. Make sure that your children also bathe or shower and get checked for ticks. Wash and tumble dry your clothing and check your pets for ticks. If you find an attached tick, don't panic, ticks are easy to remove with a pair of fine-tipped tweezers. Consult your healthcare provider if you develop a rash, fever, body aches, fatigue or headache, stiff neck, disorientation in the 1-3 weeks following a bite. It could be any number of illnesses.

Pesticides, vegetation-free play areas, and landscaping techniques for tick-free zones can also help limit your exposure to ticks and other insects.
Healthy Pets, Healthy People

While you're outside enjoying the weather, remember to protect your pets too. Keeping healthy pets will help keep you and your family healthy. Children can get roundworm and hookworm from soil contaminated by pet feces (stool), so make sure that puppies and kittens are seen by a veterinarian and dewormed. Protect family pets from ticksand fleas by keeping them on a flea and tick control program. Talk to your veterinarian for advice on the appropriate anti-bug products to use on your pet.

Dining Al Fresco

Nothing says summer like the smoky flavor of foods cooked out on the grill. When grilling, use a meat thermometer to make sure that you cook meat and poultry thoroughly. The era of medium-rare hamburgers is over! Ground beef should be cooked to an internal temperature of 160°F in order to kill germs found in raw and undercooked meat. Also, put cooked meat on a clean platter, rather than back on the one that held the raw meat, to avoid cross-contamination. Wash hands, kitchen work surfaces, and utensils with soap and water immediately after they have been in contact with raw meat or poultry. Whether you're cooking out in the backyard or on a picnic, always keep cold foods cold and hot foods hot. When you're finished eating, refrigerate leftovers promptly. For downloadable tips, see Safe Food Handling: Seven Super Steps to Safe Food In the Summer on our partner site, FightBAC.org.

Around the Yard

It is now time to seal up, trap up, and clean up to prevent rodent infestation. As you're clearing out clutter, fill any gaps or holes inside and outside your home. Eliminate or seal rodent food sources such as pet food, bird feeders, and garbage cans. Elevate hay, woodpiles, and garbage cans at least 1 foot off the ground, and trim grass and shrubbery within 100 feet of your home.

In the yard, remove any items that may collect standing water, such as buckets, old tires, and toys. Mosquitoes can breed in them in just days. You can reduce the number of ticks around your home by removing leaf litter, brush and woodpiles around your house and at the edge of your yard. By clearing trees and brush in your yard, you can reduce the likelihood that deer, rodents, and ticks will live there. Replace or repair torn window screens to keep bugs out of the house.

Gardening is a great outdoor activity for people of all ages. Stay safe and healthy as you grab your tools and head outside. Wear gloves, use safety gear when handling equipment and chemicals, protect yourself from the sun, and use insect repellent. Also watch out for extreme heat and know your limitations. You can also review and share with your love ones some tipsfor preventing heat-related illnesses.

Do not allow children to play in areas that are soiled with pet or other animal stool. Cover sandboxes when not in use to make sure that animals do not get inside and contaminate them with parasites that can cause diseases liketoxocariasis and toxoplasmosis.

Pollens and air pollutants can be triggers for allergic reactions and asthma. Some experiences include nasal and sinus allergies and hives. Asthma can cause recurrent symptoms such as wheezing, chest tightness, shortness of breath and coughing. Stay healthy by properly taking any prescription or over-the-counter allergy medicine and having and following an asthma action plan. Wearing a protective nose and mouth mask, or even sunglasses or protective eyewear, while doing yard work could help to avoid the triggers that cause allergy and asthma complications.

Fun in the Sun

Protect yourself and your family from recreational water illnesses (illnesses caused by germs or chemicals in recreational water) by doing your part to keep germs out of the pool. Do not swim when you have diarrhea, don't swallow pool water, take a shower before swimming, and wash your hands after using the toilet or changing diapers. Keeping germs out of the pool means a healthier swimming experience for everyone. Check the Healthy Swimming site's Resources page for helpful tools (such as videos, podcasts, and brochures) and "How To's," including how to use pool and hot tub test strips.

Prevent skin cancer. Avoid being outdoors during the midday if the sun is intense, use sunscreen with at least SPF 15, cover up with clothing, wear a brimmed hat, and wear sunglasses that block UVA and UVB rays. Be aware of the signs of heat stress.

In the Great Outdoors

When you're out on the trail, whether hiking, camping, or hunting, protect yourself from mosquitoes and other bugs by using insect/tick repellent. Wear permethrin-treated clothing when practical. Check your clothes and body for ticks daily. If you find any ticks, carefully remove them with tweezers. The ticks that transmit Lyme disease are most active in May, June, and July, but check for ticks in all warm months to protect yourself against other tick-borne diseases.

Just because a stream's water looks clear, it doesn't mean it's safe to drink. Giardia and Cryptosporidium are two parasites that you can't see, but they can make you very sick, so follow healthy swimming tips. Always treat or filter water to make it safe to drink.

Bats are fun to watch as they flutter around at dusk. In many camp situations, the mere presence or sighting of bats is common and normal. Sometimes, bats may be infected with rabiesand may pose a risk for exposure to humans. Remind children to never touch a bat. If you are bitten by a bat, wash the affected area thoroughly and get medical advice immediately. Whenever possible, the bat should be captured and sent to a laboratory for rabies testing. Follow instructions for capturing bats and reducing exposure while outdoors.

Enjoy the great outdoors. Have a safe and healthy spring and summer!

 

More Information

Sun Safety

Our skin is our largest organ and our first line of defense. Keep it healthy this summer through proper clothing, sunblock, and avoiding mid day when the sun's UV rays are strongest.

Return to Top


Extreme Heat

Return to Top

Thursday, 03 May 2012 17:41

Summer Safety

Summer is here, and UCHD wants to remind you to have fun in the sun, but consider these important public health topics as well.

Tuesday, 01 May 2012 15:06

Mens Health

This year, thousands of men will die from stubbornness. That is a powerful statement, but what is the meaning? It means that many men are not regularly visiting a doctor, nor are they getting their recommended health screenings, screenings that can find problems before they become deadly. Make today the day you decided to stop being stubborn and get your recommended health screenings.

Screening Tests for Men: What You Need and When

 

 

 

 

Screening tests can find diseases early when they are easier to treat. These tests can save your life. 

Health experts from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force have made recommendations, based on scientific evidence, about testing for the conditions below. Talk to your doctor about which ones apply to you and when and how often you should be tested.


Prostate Health:
In 2008, it is projected that 8,340 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in Illinois. Many men are unprepared for the health risks associated with the prostate.  But early detection saves lives.

  • Prostate cancer screening is important. You should discuss with your doctor getting a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test and digital rectal exam (DRE) yearly, beginning at age 50.
  • Men at high risk, such as African Americans and men who have a first-degree relative (father, brother or son) diagnosed with prostate cancer at an early age (younger than age 65), should begin testing at age 45. 
  • Men at even higher risk – those with several first-degree relatives who had prostate cancer at an early age – could begin testing at age 40. Depending on the results of this initial test, further testing might not be needed until age 45.

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Obesity:
Being overweight or obese can damage your health.  It increases your chances of developing diabetes, cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, many cancers and can lead to many other health problems.

Have your body mass index (BMI) calculated to screen for obesity. BMI is a measure of body fat based on height and weight. You can also find your own BMI with the BMI calculator from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute at:http://www.nhlbisupport.com/bmi/

If you are found to be overweight or obese, discuss what you can do to reduce your weight with your doctor.

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High Cholesterol:
High cholesterol can lead to heart attacks and heart disease.

Have your cholesterol checked regularly starting at age 35. If you are younger than 35, talk to your doctor about whether to have your cholesterol checked if:

  • You have diabetes.
  • You have high blood pressure.
  • Heart disease runs in your family.
  • You smoke.

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High Blood Pressure:
According to recent estimates, about one in three U.S. adults has high blood pressure, but because there are no symptoms, nearly one-third of these people don't know they have it. In fact, many people have high blood pressure for years without knowing it. Uncontrolled high blood pressure can lead to stroke, heart attack, heart failure or kidney failure. This is why high blood pressure is often called the "silent killer." The only way to tell if you have high blood pressure is to have your blood pressure checked.

Have your blood pressure checked at least every two years. High blood pressure is 140/90 or higher.

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Colorectal Cancer:
Colorectal cancer when detected early can be very effectively treated.  Getting screened can save your life.

Have a test for colorectal cancer starting at age 50. Your doctor can help you decide which test is right for you. If you have a family history of colorectal cancer, you may need to be screened earlier. 

Colorectal cancer screening is available at a discounted rate at the Union County Health Department's Sexual Health Services Clinic. Click here to get more information on the Sexual Health Clinic.

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Diabetes:
Diabetes can increase your risk for blindness, kidney failure, heart disease, sexual dysfunction, nervous system damage and amputation of a limb.  Nearly one third of those with diabetes don’t know they have it.  Diabetes is more common in African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. If you are a member of one of these ethnic groups, you need to pay special attention to this test.

Most adults get pre-diabetes before they get diabetes.  The good news is that the recently completed Diabetes Prevention Program study conclusively showed that people with pre-diabetes can prevent the development of adult diabetes by making changes in their diet and increasing their level of physical activity.

Have a test for diabetes if you have high blood pressure or high cholesterol.

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Depression:
Your emotional health is as important as your physical health. If you have felt "down," sad, or hopeless over the last two weeks or have felt little interest or pleasure in doing things, you may be depressed. Talk to your doctor about being screened for depression.

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Sexually Transmitted Infections:
Talk to your doctor to see whether you should be tested for HIV, gonorrhea, syphilis, chlamydia or other sexually transmitted diseases. If you are having unprotected sex with anyone other than a long term monogamous partner or if you suspect your partner is not monogamous and you are having unprotected sex with them, you should ask your doctor about getting tested.

Free and reduced cost STD testing is available for men and women at the Union County Health Department's Sexual Health Services Clinic. Click here to get more information on the Sexual Health Clinic.

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HIV:
Talk to your doctor about HIV screening if you:

  • Have had unprotected sex with anyone other than a long term monogamous partner.
  • Suspect your partner is not monogamous and you have had unprotected sex with them
  • Are being treated for a sexually transmitted disease.
  • Had a blood transfusion between 1978 and 1985.
  • Have had sex with men since 1975.
  • Have used or now use injection drugs.
  • Exchange sex for money or drugs or have sex partners who do.
  • Have past or present sex partners who are HIV-infected, are bisexual or use injection drugs.

 

Free, confidential rapid HIV testing is available at the Union County Health Department during our Adult Clinic hours, Mondays and Tuesdays from 8-9am and 3-4pm and Thursdays and Fridays from 8-9am. Call (937) 642-2053 for an appointment.

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Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm:
An aneurysm is a widening of a blood vessel. The aorta is one of the large blood vessels that takes blood from the heart to the rest of the body.  So an aortic aneurysm is a widening of this particular important blood vessel – a little like a bulge on an old tire.  Abdominal aortic aneurysms are most common after age 60. Males are 5 times more likely than females to be affected. This means men over 60 are at highest risk to develop an abdominal aortic aneurysm. Approximately 5% of men over age 60 develop an abdominal aortic aneurysm.

Rupture of an abdominal aneurysm is a catastrophe. It is highly lethal and is usually preceded by excruciating pain in the lower abdomen and back, with tenderness of the aneurysm. Rupture of an abdominal aneurysm causes profuse bleeding and leads to shock. Death may rapidly follow. Half of all persons with untreated abdominal aortic aneurysms die of rupture within 5 years. Abdominal aortic aneurysms are the 13th leading cause of death in the U.S. But an aortic aneurysm can be treated by surgery and so detection can save your life.

If you are between the ages of 65 and 75 and have ever smoked (100 or more cigarettes during your lifetime), you need to be screened once for abdominal aortic aneurysm, which is an abnormally large or swollen blood vessel in your abdomen.

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Recommended Screening Tests By Age:
The following chart lists recommended screenings and immunizations for men at average risk for most diseases. These are guidelines only. Your health care provider will personalize the timing of each test and immunization to best meet your health care needs.

Screening Tests

Ages 18- 39

Ages 40- 49

Ages 50- 64

Ages 65 and Older

General health: Full checkup, perform a thorough physical exam and discuss health related topics with doctor. 

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Blood tests and urinalysis:  Screens for various illnesses and diseases (such as cholesterol, diabetes, kidney or thyroid dysfunction) before symptoms occur.

Every 3 years.

Every 2 years.

Every year.

Every year.

Heart health

Blood pressure test

At least every 2 years.

At least every 2 years.

At least every 2 years.

At least every 2 years.

Cholesterol test

Start at age 20, discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

EKG (Electrocardiogram)

Baseline at age 30.

Every 4 years

Every 3 years.

Every 3 years.

Prostate health

Digital Rectal Exam (DRE)

 

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) (blood test)

 

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Reproductive health

Testicular exam

Monthly self-exam; and part of a general checkup.

Monthly self-exam; and part of a general checkup.

Monthly self-exam; and part of a general checkup.

Monthly self-exam; and part of a general checkup.

Sexually transmitted disease (STD) tests

Both partners should get tested for STDs, including HIV, before initiating sexual intercourse.

Both partners should get tested for STDs, including HIV, before initiating sexual intercourse.

Both partners should get tested for STDs, including HIV, before initiating sexual intercourse.

Both partners should get tested for STDs, including HIV, before initiating sexual intercourse.

Chlamydia test

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Colorectal health

Fecal occult blood test

 

 

Yearly.

Yearly.

Flexible Sigmoidoscopy (with fecal occult blood test is preferred)

 

 

Every 5 years(if not having a colonoscopy).

 

Every 5 years (if not having a colonoscopy).

 

Double Contrast Barium Enema (DCBE)

 

 

Every 5-10 years (if not having a colonoscopy orsigmoidoscopy).

 

Every 5-10 years (if not having a colonoscopy orsigmoidoscopy).

Colonoscopy

 

 

Every 10 years

Every 10 years

Rectal exam

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Every 5-10 years with each screening

(sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, or DCBE).

Every 5-10 years with each screening

(sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, or DCBE).

Eye and ear health

Eye exam

Get your eyes checked if you have problems or visual changes.

Every 2-4years.

Every 2-4 years.

Every 2-4 years.

Hearing test

Starting at age 18, then every 10 years.

Every 10 years.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Skin health

  Mole exam

Monthly mole self-exam; by a doctor every 3 years, starting at age 20.

Monthly mole self-exam; by a doctor every year.

Monthly mole self-exam; by a doctor every year.

Monthly mole self-exam; by a doctor every year.

TB Skin Test (Should be done on occasion of exposure or suggestive symptoms at direction of physician. Some occupations may require more frequent testing for public health indications.)

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Oral health: Dental exam

One to two times every year.

One to two times every year.

One to two times every year.

One to two times every year.

Chest x-ray:  Should be considered in smokers over the age of 45. The usefulness of this test on a yearly basis is debatable due to poor cure rates of lung cancer.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Mental health screening

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Immunizations

Influenza vaccine

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Yearly.

Yearly.

Pneumococcal vaccine

 

 

 

One time only.

Tetanus-Diphtheria Booster vaccine

Every 10 years.

Every 10 years.

Every 10 years.

Every 10 years.

Other screenings and exams

Breast (To find abnormal lumps in their earliest stages)

Monthly self-exam; and part of a general checkup.

Monthly self-exam; and part of a general checkup.

Monthly self-exam; and part of a general checkup.

Monthly self-exam; and part of a general checkup.

Bone health (Bone mineral density test. Testing is best done under the supervision of your physician.)

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Testosterone screening (Low testosterone symptoms include low sex drive, erectile dysfunction, fatigue and depression. Initial screening for symptoms with a questionnaire followed by a simple blood test.)

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Discuss with your doctor or nurse.

Click here for a printable version of the above recommended Men's Health Screening. 

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Screening Test Checklist:
Take this checklist with you to your doctor's office. Write down when you have any of the tests below. Talk to your doctor about your test results and write them down here. Ask when you should have the test next and record the date. If you think of questions for the doctor, write them down and bring them to your next visit.

Test

Last Test Month/Year

Results

Next Test Due Month/Year

Questions for the Doctor

Weight

(BMI)

 

 

 

 

Cholesterol

Total:

 

 

 

 

HDL
(good):

 

 

 

 

LDL
(bad):

 

 

 

 

Blood pressure

 

 

 

 

Colorectal cancer

  • Hemoccult
  • Flexible Sigmoidoscopy
  • Colonoscopy

 

 

 

 

Diabetes

 

 

 

 

Eye exam

 

 

 

 

Skin screening

 

 

 

 

Oral screening

 

 

 

 

Hearing test

 

 

 

 

Sexually transmitted diseases (Syphilis, Chlamydia, Gonorrhea and other STDs)

 

 

 

 

HIV infection

 

 

 

 

Abdominal aortic aneurysm

(one-time test)

 

 

 

 

Rectal exam (hemorrhoids, lower rectal problems and prostate cancer)

 

 

 

 

PSA blood test

 

 

 

 

Chest X-ray

 

 

 

 

EKG

 

 

 

 

Kidney or Thyroid dysfunction

 

 

 

 

Mental health screening

 

 

 

 

Tetanus Booster

 

 

 

 

Breast screening

 

 

 

 

TB Skin Test

 

 

 

 

Bone Health

 

 

 

 

Testosterone Screening

 

 

 

 


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Should You Take Medicines to Prevent Disease?

Aspirin:

Ask your doctor about taking aspirin to prevent heart disease if you:

  • Are Older than 45
  • Are Younger than 45 and have high blood pressure
  • Have high cholesterol
  • Have diabetes
  • Smoke

Immunizations:

Stay up-to-date with your immunizations:

  • Have a flu shot every year starting at least at age 50. If you are younger than 50, consult your doctor about a flu shot.
  • Have a pneumonia shot once after you turn 65. If you are younger, ask your doctor whether you need a pneumonia shot.
  • Have a tetanus shot every 10 years.

 

(This content taken from the Illinois Department of Public Health)

 

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