UCHD, Protecting Your Health.

 

Thursday, 26 June 2014 14:55

Recipe of the Week: Raspberries

Try a new recipe! The Wellness Consortium of Union County has partnered with Union County Farmer's Market to bring you information and healthy recipes that feature locally grown fruits and vegetables.

 

 FRUIT OF THE WEEK: Raspberries

Raspberries are a great low-calorie food.  In fact, a cup of raspberries has only about 65 calories! Raspberries are an excellent source of Vitamin C. Raspberries are also a good source of fiber (approx. 20 grams per 1/2 pound), as well as a good source of soluble fiber and may lower high blood cholesterol levels and slow release of carbohydrates into the blood stream of diabetics.

Selecting Berries:

 

Raspberries may be red, black, yellow, or purple. The red raspberry is the first to ripen, followed by black and then purple and yellow. Some varieties produce two crops a year and are called everbearing
or fallbearing.

Ripe raspberries should be large, bright, shiny, uniform in color and ripeness, attractive, firm, and of good quality. Taste varies from tart to sweet depending on the variety and maturity.

 

Handling & Storage:

 

Handle fruit gently to avoid bruising. Bruising shortens the life of the fruit and contributes to low quality.

Sort carefully and place berries loosely in a shallow container to allow air circulation and to prevent the berries on top from crushing those underneath.

Berries are highly perishable. Store immediately in the refrigerator.

Do not wash berries before refrigerating.

To prepare, rinse berries gently in cold water. Lift out of water and drain. Never soak berries in water.

 

Refrgierate for use within 1-2 days.

Info by: University of Illinois Extension and the Ohio State University Extension

 2016 Recipes

2016 Grape Recipe Card

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2016 Berry Recipe Card 1

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 2014 Recipe Card - Raspberry Chocolate Chip Frozen Yogurt - Raspberries

 

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Published in Partnerships
Tuesday, 25 June 2013 15:30

Recipe of the Week: Winter Squash

Try a new recipe! The Wellness Consortium of Union County has partnered with Union County Farmer's Market to bring you information and healthy recipes that feature locally grown fruits and vegetables.

Vegetable of the week: Winter Squashwinter squash

 

Winter squash is a warm-season vegetable that can be grown in most of the country. It differs from summer squash in that it is harvested and eaten in the mature fruit stage, when the seeds within have matured fully and the skin has hardened into a tough rind. When ripened to this stage, fruits of most varieties can be stored for use throughout the winter.

 

Selection & Storage
The squash family (Cucurbitaceae) includes pumpkins, summer squash and winter squash. They are really edible gourds. There are many varieties with a wide range of flavors and textures. Winter squash does not look the same either. Their tough outer shells can be smooth or bumpy, thin or thick and rock hard with a wide array of colors.

 

The most popular winter squash includes acorn, buttercup, butternut, calabaza, delicata, Hubbard, spaghetti, sweet dumpling, and Terk's Turban. There are many more, but this section will be limited to the above-mentioned varieties.

 

Winter squash is planted in the spring, grows all summer and is always harvested at the mature stage in early autumn before the first frost. Immature winter squash lacks flavor, so wait until the rind is hard. Harvest winter squash with two inches of stem remaining. A stem cut too short is like an open wound, which will cause early decay.

 

For storage, harvest sturdy, heavy squashes with fairly glossy skin that is unblemished by soft spots, cuts, breaks or uncharacteristic discoloration. Most winter squash benefits from a curing stage; the exceptions are acorn, sweet dumpling and delicata. Curing is simply holding the squash at room temperature (about 70 degrees) for 10 to 20 days.

 

After curing, transfer to a cool (45 to 50 degrees), dry place such as the basement or garage for long term storage. Careful, do not allow them to freeze. The large hard rind winter squash can be stored up to six months under these conditions. Warmer temperatures simply mean shorter storage time.

 

The smaller acorn and butternut do not store as well, only up to 3 months. Store cut pieces of winter squash in the refrigerator. Refrigeration is too humid for whole squash, and they will deteriorate quickly

Nutrition
Winter squash is a tasty source of complex carbohydrate (natural sugar and starch) and fiber. Fiber, which was once called roughage, absorbs water and becomes bulky in the stomach. It works throughout the intestinal track, cleaning and moving waste quickly out of the body. Research suggests that this soluble fiber plays an important role in reducing the incidence of colon cancer.

 

Winter squash is also a source of potassium, niacin, iron and beta carotene. The orange-fleshed squash is also an excellent source of beta carotene. As a general rule, the deeper the orange color, the higher the beta carotene content. Beta carotene is converted to Vitamin A in the body. Vitamin A being essential for healthy skin, vision, bone development and maintenance as well as many other functions.

 

The nutrient content of winter squash varies, depending on the variety. The following information is a summary of all varieties, cooked, baked and cubed.

 

Nutrition Facts (1 cup cooked, cubes)

 

  • Calories 79.95
  • Protein 1.82 grams
  • Carbohydrate 17.94 grams
  • Dietary Fiber 5.74 grams
  • Calcium 28.7 mg
  • Iron 0.67 mg
  • Potassium 895.85 mg
  • Folate 57.40 mcg
  • Vitamin A 7,291.85

 

Preparation
Peeling winter squash can be a challenge to the novice. The thin-skinned varieties (acorn, butternut, delicata and sweet dumpling) can be peeled with a paring knife or vegetable peeler.

 

Most recipes using these varieties call for cutting the squash in half. Position the squash on a cutting board, stem end facing you. Place the blade of a heavy chef's knife horizontally along the length of the squash. With a hammer or mallet, repeatedly hit the back of the blade near the handle to drive it into the squash until it breaks in half.

 

Place the larger varieties (Hubbard and Turk's Turban) on newspaper and use a sharp cleaver to split the hard-rind open. Or use the chef's knife method described above. Once you have a slit cut, bang on a hard surface and pull apart. Pieces are easier to peel. With a spoon, scoop out the seeds and strings and discard, or set aside if you plan to roast the seeds. For instructions on roasting seeds, visit our website Pumpkins and More and substitute squash seeds in the recipe.

 

To cook winter squash, place unpeeled pieces cut sides down on a shallow baking dish and bake in a 350°F oven for 30 minutes or longer. Check for doneness by piercing with a fork or skewer. When tender, remove from the oven and allow the pieces to cool. Spoon out the soft flesh and mash with a fork or process in a blender or food processor. Peeled pieces can be cut into cubes and boiled until tender. Use with any recipe calling for cooked mashed or pureed squash. Or microwave the squash pieces on high for 15 minutes or longer.

 

Small acorn squash and spaghetti squash can be pierced in several places with a long-tined fork or metal skewer and baked whole. Piercing prevents the shell from bursting during cooking. Place the squash on a baking dish and bake for 1 1/2 to 2 hours at 325°F. Test for doneness by squeezing the shell. When it gives a bit with pressure, it is done.

 

Preservation
Store whole winter squash in an area where temperatures range from 45 to 50°F for three to six months. At room temperature reduce storage time to one and a half to three months depending on variety. See the selection and storage information above.

 

Cooked squash freezes well. Pack into freezer containers or freezer bags leaving 1/2 inch head space and freeze for up to one year. Canning is not recommended unless the squash is cut into cubes.

 

Mashed squash is too dense and heat penetration is uneven. Because spaghetti squash does not stay cubed on heating, it should be frozen instead of canned. For all other varieties, follow the procedure and processing times outlined in canning pumpkin.

 

Information adapted from http://urbanext.illinois.edu/veggies/wsquash.cfm
University of Illinois Extension- Urban Programs, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, College of ACES
@2013 University of Illinois Board of Trustees

 2016 Recipe

2016 Squash Recipe Card

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2015 Recipe

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 2014 Recipe

2014 Recipe Card - Apple-Stuffed Acorn Squash - Squash

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2013 Recipe (Oven Roasted Squash and Baked Pumpkin)

baked pumpkin 2

 

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pumpkin soup rc

 

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Published in Partnerships
Monday, 24 June 2013 20:38

Recipe of the Week: Okra

Try a new recipe! The Wellness Consortium of Union County has partnered with Union County Farmer's Market to bring you information and healthy recipes that feature locally grown fruits and vegetables.

Vegetable of the Week: Okra okra

 

Okra (also known as gumbo), is a tall-growing, warm-season, annual vegetable from the same family as hollyhock, rose of Sharon and hibiscus. The immature pods are used for soups, canning and stews or as a fried or boiled vegetable. The hibiscus like flowers and upright plant (3 to 6 feet or more in height) have ornamental value for backyard gardens.

 

Selection & Storage
Gumbo is Swahili for okra. The recent upsurge in the popularity of gumbo has also brought renewed attention to okra. Okra was brought to the new world by African slaves during the slave trade.

 

The pods must be harvested when they are very young. Preferably two inches long although three inch pods can also be salvaged. Harvest daily as the pods go quickly from tender to tough with increased size.

 

Refrigerate unwashed, dry okra pods in the vegetable crisper, loosely wrapped in perforated plastic bags. Wet pods will quickly mold and become slimy. Okra will keep for only two or three days. When the ridges and tips of the pod start to turn dark, use it or lose it. Once it starts to darken, okra will quickly deteriorate.

 

Nutrition
Okra is a powerhouse of valuable nutrients. Nearly half of which is soluble fiber in the form of gums and pectins. Soluble fiber helps to lower serum cholesterol, reducing the risk of heart disease. The other half is insoluble fiber which helps to keep the intestinal tract healthy decreasing the risk of some forms of cancer, especially colorectal cancer. Nearly 10% of the recommended levels of vitamin B6 and folic acid are also present in a half cup of cooked okra.

 

Nutrition Facts (1/2 cup sliced, cooked okra)

 

  • Calories 25
  • Dietary Fiber 2 grams
  • Protein 1.52 grams
  • Carbohydrates 5.76 grams
  • Vitamin A 460 IU
  • Vitamin C 13.04 mg
  • Folic acid 36.5 micrograms
  • Calcium 50.4 mg
  • Iron 0.4 mg
  • Potassium 256.6 mg
  • Magnesium 46 mg

 

Preparation & Serving
Okra exudes a unique mucilaginous juice which is responsible for its thickening power in the famous Louisiana Creole gumbo dish. Aside from gumbo, okra compliments tomatoes, onions and corn, shellfish and fish stock. Okra has a subtle taste, similar to the flavor of eggplant.

 

Freezing is the best method for long term home storage of okra. Freeze only young, tender okra. Okra must be blanched before freezing, as with all vegetables. Unblanched okra will quickly become tough and suffer huge nutrient, flavor and color loss during freezing. Follow the procedure outlined below for successful home freezing.

 

To Prepare Okra for Freezing

 

  • Since freezing does not improve the quality of any vegetable, it is important to start with fresh green pods. Avoid pods longer than 2 to 2-1/2 inches long. Okra that is at peak quality for eating is best for freezing.
  • In a blanching pot or large pot with tight fitting lid, bring about 5 quarts of water to a rolling boil.
  • Meanwhile, wash, and trim of stems of okra pods, leaving caps whole.

Information adapted from http://urbanext.illinois.edu/veggies/okra.cfm

University of Illinois Extension, Urban Programs, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, College of ACES, 2013 University of Illinois Board of Trustees

 2015 Recipe

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2013 Recipe

veggie stir fry- okra

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Published in Partnerships
Friday, 21 June 2013 17:25

Recipe of the Week: Herbs

Try a new recipe! The Wellness Consortium of Union County has partnered with Union County Farmer's Market to bring you information and healthy recipes that feature locally grown fruits and vegetables.

 

Rosemary, a native plant to the Mediterranean, is a fragrant herb used in cooking.  It is commonly used as a flavoring for meats, breads, marinades and dressings.  Rosemary is also used for scenting soaps and cosmetics, and is said to have medicinal properties.  Rosemary is an evergreen shrub that is hardy to temperatures of 5F.  In Ohio most gardeners typically treat this plant as an annual but gardeners can over-winter plants by putting them in a container and moving them inside.  Rosemary grows best in sunny, well-drained, moist sites.  Plants should be planted approximately one foot apart from each other.  Prune stems throughout the season as needed.  Leaves can be used fresh or dried.

Information taken from http://bygl.osu.edu/content/vegetable-rosemary-rosmarinus-officinalis

 

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2014 Recipe Card - Garlic Rosemary Mushrooms - Rosemary

 

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2014 Recipe Card - Spinach Stuffed Chicken and Rice - Herbs

 

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Published in Partnerships
Wednesday, 30 May 2012 19:32

Recipe of the Week: Cabbage

Try a new recipe! The Wellness Consortium of Union County has partnered with Union County Farmer's Market to bring you information and healthy recipes that feature locally grown fruits and vegetables.

Vegetable of the week: Cabbagecabbage

Cabbage is a hardy vegetable that grows especially well in fertile soils. There are various shades of green available, as well as red or purple types. Head shape varies from the standard round to flattened or pointed. Most varieties have smooth leaves, but the Savoy types have crinkly textured leaves. Cabbage is easy to grow if you select suitable varieties and practice proper culture and insect management. Always regarded as a good source of vitamins, cabbage recently has been show

Recommended Varieties Green cabbage is grown more often than the red or Savoy types, but red cabbage has become increasingly popular for color in salads and cooked dishes. The Savoy varieties are grown for slaw and salads. Varieties that mature later usually grow larger heads and are more suitable for making sauerkraut than the early varieties.

Selection & Storage

Harvest large, unsplit heads of green cabbage. Look for tight, heavy heads, free of insects and decay. Fresh, uncut heads of cabbage can be stored in the refrigerator for up to two weeks. Cover loosely with a plastic bag or use perforated bags. Do not wash cabbage before storing, the extra moisture will hasten deterioration.

  • Green cabbage — Green cabbage is sometimes called Dutch White. The outer leaves are dark green and the inner leaves are smooth and pale to medium green. If you plan to eat the cabbage raw, use within a few days. Cabbage that you plan to cook can be stored in the refrigerator for about two weeks.
  • Savoy cabbage — Crinkly, with waves of blue-green leaves, Savoy cabbage is a beautiful sight growing in the garden. These thin, richly flavored leaves are ideal served raw in salads or cooked. Cooked Savoys do not have the strong sulfur odor of green cabbage. Savoy only keep for about 4 days in the refrigerator so buy it when you plan to use it.
  • Red cabbage — This variety is usually smaller and denser than heads of green cabbage. The flavor of red cabbage is slightly peppery and it is very susceptible to color change. Cook red cabbage with vinegar (or other acidic ingredient) or it will turn an ugly blue-gray color. Always use stainless steel knives and cookware when preparing red cabbage to prevent color changes.

Preparation 

Cabbage is king of the cruciferous vegetable family. Sadly, many think of cabbage as an odoriferous and unpleasant vegetable. Cooked cabbage has been wrongfully accused of smelling-up kitchens and hallways everywhere. But don't blame the cabbage, blame the cook. The notorious odor problem is a result of over cooking. Cabbage contains isothiocynates that break down into smelly sulfur compounds during cooking. The reaction is even stronger in aluminum pans. The longer the cabbage is cooked the more smelly the compounds become. The solution; a brief cooking time. Cook just until tender and use stainless steel pots and pans.

There is another adverse effect associated with cabbage — gas. Bacteria that live naturally in the intestinal tract degrade the dietary fiber (indigestible carbohydrates) in cabbage, producing gas that some find distressing. In spite of this unpopular side effect, cabbage offers huge benefits that cannot be ignored.

One medium head (2-1/2 pounds) of green cabbage yields 9 cups shredded raw and 7 cups cooked. The top portion of the cabbage head is more tender and shreds easier than the bottom. If it is practical, cut the head horizontal and use the top, raw in salads and slaw and use the bottom half in cooked recipes.

Nutrition

There are literally hundred of varieties of cabbage. The most popular varieties in the United States are green cabbage and bok choy. As with broccoli, cabbage is a cruciferous vegetable and may reduce the risk of some forms of cancer including colorectal cancers. Cabbage is also high in beta-carotene, vitamin C and fiber. Other substantial nutrients in a half cup cooked cabbage include the following.

Nutrition Facts (1/2 cup cooked green cabbage)

  • Calories 16
  • Dietary fiber 2.9 grams
  • Carbohydrates 3.6 mg
  • Vitamin C 18.2 mg

Information from http://urbanext.illinois.edu/veggies/cabbage1.html

 2016 Recipe

2016 Lettuce Recipe Card

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2016 Recipe

2016 Cabbage Recipe Card

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2015 Recipe

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2015 Recipe

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2014 Recipe

2014 Recipe Card - Cabbage Roll Casserole - Cabbage

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 2013 Recipe

Backyard Slaw 2013

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 2012 Recipe

 Chinese Chicken_Salad__2012

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Published in Partnerships

Try a new recipe! The Wellness Consortium of Union County has partnered with Union County Farmer's Market to bring you information and healthy recipes that feature locally grown fruits and vegetables.

Vegetable of the week: Parsnips

Parsnip

Parsnips look like a pale carrot and are actually a relative of the carrot, celeriac, and parsley root. Commonly found in Europe, this root vegetable arrived to the United States with the colonists. Popular in the 19th and early 20th centuries for its celery flavor and nutty fragrance, this vegetable was often used in recipes that called for caloric decadence.

 

Availability, Selection, Storage, and Preparation

Parsnips are available year round with a peak from fall into spring. They are often displayed with the parsley root, so be sure you know which is a parsnip. Parsley roots are typically sold with their feathery greens whereas parsnips are sold by the root.

Select medium sized roots with uniform creamy beige skin. Avoid limp, pitted, or shriveled roots. Store parsnips unwashed wrapped in paper towel, placed in plastic, and store in the vegetable crisper of the refrigerator for about 2 weeks.

Wash, peel, and trim parsnips as you would a carrot. If steaming, then the parsnips skins will slip off after cooking. If pureeing parsnips, then leave skins intact.

Photo of a parsnip

 

 

From www.fruitsandveggiesmatter.gov

 

 

 Parsnip-Carrot Gratin_2102

 

 

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Published in Partnerships
Thursday, 24 May 2012 13:26

Recipe of the Week:Peaches

Try a new recipe! The Wellness Consortium of Union County has partnered with Union County Farmer's Market to bring you information and healthy recipes that feature locally grown fruits and vegetables.

Fruit of the week: Peaches

The peach is a member of the rose family. It was first cultivated in China and revered as a symbol of longevity. The image was placed on pottery and received as a gift with great esteem. Travelers along caravan routes carried the peach seed to Persia before it was cultivated in Europe. In the early 1600s Spanish explorers brought it to the New World and by the 1700s missionaries had established peaches in California.

Varieties

 

Peaches are available almost all year. The season dictates the variety. Semi-freestones (Queencrest) are early season late April to June. In mid-June the market shifts to freestone (Elegant Lady) or clingstone. On the off seasons peaches are imported into the U.S. from Chile and Mexico. Fresh varieties are sold as freestone while clingstone is usually used for canning. The fruit inside these peaches is either yellow or white. The white flesh is a "sub-acid" fruit its flavor is more sugary sweet. The more traditional color is yellow. It's more acidic, which does give it a bit more flavor. Half of the United States crop comes from the South and the other half from California. The United States also produces 25% of the total world market (THE PACKER 1999).

Selection

When selecting fresh peaches, look for ones that are soft to the touch, blemish free, and have a fragrant smell. Peaches that are mildly fragrant ripen into sweet and delicious flavors. Choose fruit that has a background color of yellow or cream and has a fresh looking appearance. Peaches may have some red "blush" depending on the variety, but this isn't a sign of how the fruit will taste after it's ripened. At home peaches can be ripened at room temperature in a brown paper bag in 2 to 3 days. Peaches are highly perishable, so don't buy more than you plan to use. When selecting can peaches, choose those labeled "packed in it's own juice" and "no added sugar"; these are the healthier choices.

Photo of peachesStorage

The best way to ripen stone fruit is to place the fruit in a paper bag, fold the top of the bag over loosely, and place the bag on the counter for one to three days. Never store hard fruit in the refrigerator, in plastic bags, or in direct sunlight.
Check the fruit daily. When it is ripe, it will be aromatic and will give slightly to gentle pressure. Once ripened, it can be stored in the refrigerator for about a week.

Use

Wash peaches carefully in cool soapy water, then rinse well before eating or using. Unless a recipe calls for it, you never need to peel the fruits; in fact, many of the nutrients found in stone fruits are contained in the peel, and it's highly recommended that the peel be consumed along with the flesh. If used in cooking they peel really fast if blanched in boiling water for a minute then plunged into ice water to cool. In fruit salads or platters, sprinkle cut peaches with lemon juice to help them keep their great color.

 2016 Recipes

2016 Plum Recipe Card

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2016 Peach Recipe Card 1

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 peachy pops_2012_pub

 

 

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Published in Partnerships
Thursday, 24 May 2012 13:17

Recipe of the Week:Cauliflower

Try a new recipe! The Wellness Consortium of Union County has partnered with Union County Farmer's Market to bring you information and healthy recipes that feature locally grown fruits and vegetables.

Vegetable of the week: Cauliflower

Cauliflower, as its name implies, is a flower growing from a plant. In its early stages, it resembles broccoli, which is its closest relative. While broccoli opens outward to sprout bunches of green florets, cauliflower forms a compact head of undeveloped white flower buds. The heavy green leaves that surround the head protect the flower buds from the sunlight. The lack of exposure to sunlight does not allow chlorophyll to develop. Therefore, color is not produced, and the head remains a white color. Cauliflower is an excellent source of Vitamin C.

Selection

Cauliflower is generally available year round, but it is usually more plentiful in autumn. When selecting cauliflower, look for heads that are white or creamy white, firm, compact, and heavy for their size. There should not be any speckling of discoloration on the head or leaves. Avoid cauliflower with brown patches. A medium-size head, that is 6 inches in diameter and weighs about 2 pounds, will serve 4 to 6 people.

Storage

Cauliflower will keep for up to five days if stored in the crisper section of the refrigerator. If the head is not purchased wrapped, store it in an open or perforated plastic bag. Keep the head stem-side up to prevent moisture form collecting on it. For the best flavor, cauliflower should be eaten as soon as possible. Precut florets do not keep well, and they are best when eaten within a day of purchase.

Varieties

There are two types of cauliflower on the market today. The creamy white florets are more abundant in the United States but some markets sell a recently developed cauliflower-broccoli hybrid. This type of cauliflower has a green curd and resembles broccoli. The green variety is less dense than the white, cooks more quickly, and has a milder taste.

 

Preparation

Cauliflower can be served cooked or raw. Peel off stem leaves. Turn cauliflower upside down. Cut the stem just above where the florets join together. Separate the florets into equal sized pieces. Cut if necessary.

When cooking cauliflower, you may leave the head whole. Rapid cooking time not only reduces the odorous sulfur compounds but also preserves crispness, color, and reduces the loss of nutrients that will leach into the cooking water when vegetables are overcooked. Steaming and microwaving cauliflower will better preserve its vitamin content, especially the B vitamins, than if it is boiled. To microwave cauliflower, put 2 cups of florets in a shallow microwavable dish, or cover a whole head of cauliflower with plastic wrap. For florets, cook for 3 minutes on high, then let stand for 2 minutes. For whole cauliflower, cook on high for 3 minutes, turn head over, and cook for an additional 2 to 4 minutes. Let stand for 3 minutes. To steam cauliflower, place it in a steamer basket, and then place in a pot with 2 inches of water. Cover and steam. Florets will take 3 to 5 minutes to cook. A whole head of cauliflower (1 ½ pounds) will take 15 to 20 minutes to cook, but begin checking for tenderness after 12 minutes.

Tip

Cauliflower may turn yellow in alkaline water. For whiter cauliflower, add a tablespoon of milk or lemon juice to the water. Do not cook cauliflower in an aluminum or iron pot. The chemical compounds in cauliflower will react with the aluminum and turn the vegetable yellow. While in an iron pot, it will turn a brown or blue-green color.

From www.fruitsandveggiesmatter.gov

 2016 Recipe

 2016 Cauliflower Recipe Card

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 cauliflower crunch_2012_pub

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Published in Partnerships
Thursday, 24 May 2012 13:12

Recipe of the Week: Apples

Try a new recipe! The Wellness Consortium of Union County has partnered with Union County Farmer's Market to bring you information and healthy recipes that feature locally grown fruits and vegetables.

Fruit of the week: Applesapples

Selection

When selecting apples, look for fruit that is well colored for its variety. Apples with punctures or bruises should be avoided or used first, since they will not store as well.  Surface blemishes that do not penetrate the skin, such as russetting, have very little influence on fruit quality or storage life. Although apples are fairly durable fruits, take care to avoid bruising them.

Choosing a variety of apple is usually personal preference.  However, some apple varieties have particular qualities worth noting, especially for cooking:

    • Cortland is sweet with a hint of tartness. It resists browning so is excellent for salads, as well as snacking, pies, sauce, baking, and freezing.
    • McIntosh is sweet and juicy. The texture is less firm than some varieties. It is excellent for snacking, pies and sauce, and good for salads and freezing.
    • Golden Delicious is a sweet, all-around variety excellent for snacking, salads, pies, sauce, baking, and freezing.
    • Jonagold is honey sweet. It’s an excellent variety for snacking, salads, sauce, and baking, and good for pies and freezing.
    • Ginger Gold and Empire are sweet, making them excellent for snacking and salads, and good for pies, sauce, and baking.
    • Jonathan is a tart apple considered excellent for snacking, salads, pies, sauce, and baking, and good for freezing.
    • Red Delicious are sweet and juicy, making them good for snacking and salads.
    • Honey Crisp has a juicy sweet/tart flavor. It is excellent for snacking, salads, pies, sauce, and freezing, and good for baking.

Try picking apples at an orchard near you in the fall. Local apples are also readily available at many stands and farmers markets.

Storage

Handle apples with care. Bumps and bruises can lead to dark, soft spots. Apples should not be left at room temperature. Although apples may be displayed in a fruit bowl at room temperature for a short period, such conditions will dramatically reduce their usable life. Store them in a cool, dry place, or keep them in a plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper. Poke several holes in the bag for ventilation.  Apples will last the longest at temperatures close to 32ºF.  Apples will absorb odors from other foods, so remember to keep them separated from strong foods such as onions, garlic, and turnips.  Properly stored, most varieties will keep from four to six weeks. Check often and remove any apples that are beginning to show decay.

Nutrition 

Fresh apples are low in calories, with only about 75 calories in a small apple. They are also a good source of fiber, and virtually fat free. In fact, they are considered a heart-healthy food due to their soluble fiber, which has a cholesterol-lowering effect. Amounts of vitamin C and potassium are also found in apples. One small apple or one cup of sliced or chopped raw or cooked apple counts as a one-cup serving of fruit.

Preparation

Always wash apples before eating or cooking. Whenever possible, don’t peel apples. Two thirds of the fiber and many of the antioxidants are found in the apple’s peel. Apple flesh browns quickly when exposed to air. To prevent this, use acidic juice—such as lemon, orange, or pineapple—to coat the cut fruit, or cover pieces with water while preparing a recipe.

Info by: University of Maine Cooperative Extension

2016 Recipe

2016 Apple Recipe Card

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2014 Recipe

2014 Recipe Card - Quick and Easy Microwave Apples- Apples

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2013 Recipe

apple and bow tie salad

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2012 Recipe 

 Apple Coffee_Cake_2012_pub

 

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Published in Partnerships

Try a new recipe! The Wellness Consortium of Union County has partnered with Union County Farmer's Market to bring you information and healthy recipes that feature locally grown fruits and vegetables.

 Vegetable of the week: Turnips

This root vegetable has been found all over Europe and Asia for centuries. A turnip looks larger than a radish and is a well known food source for both the root and greens. Turnips come in all shapes, sizes, and colors.

Availability, Selection, Storage, and Preparation

Turnips are available year round with a peak in the fall and winter months. Select smooth surfaced roots that are firm and heavy with some root hairs at the bottom. In general, the smaller the turnip, the sweeter the taste. Turnips keep well; cut the greens and bag them separately from the root placing them in the crisper section of the refrigerator for up to a week. Turnips can be peeled before cooking, eaten raw, or sliced, diced, or julienned. When cooking this delicate root, cook only to the just tender point; avoid overcooking as sweetness will diminish.

From www.fruitsandveggiesmatter.gov

 

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