UCHD, Protecting Your Health.

 

Tuesday, 22 May 2012 19:17

Recipe of the Week: Corn

Try a new recipe! The Wellness Consortium of Union County has partnered with Union County Farmer's Market to bring you information and healthy recipes that feature locally grown fruits and vegetables.

Vegetable of the Week: Corncorn

 

Fresh sweet corn has long been an American favorite. In Ohio, the sweet corn season begins about July 1 and continues until the first frost (late September or early October). Fresh sweet corn is most plentiful from July 20 to September 15. 

Selection

  • Top-quality sweet corn ears have fresh green  husks and ears well-filled with bright-colored, plump, and milky kernels.
  • Ears should be free of insect and disease damage. 
  • Husks and ears should glisten with moistness. 
  • Corn is overripe if indentions have formed in the kernels or kernel contents are doughy when broken.

Storage
For highest quality, harvest and use ears promptly.

If fresh sweet corn is to be kept for any period of time, husk, immerse in ice water, and refrigerate at a temperature near 32 degrees F.

Nutrition
The “Dietary Guidelines for Americans” recom­mend that adults need 2–2½ cups of a variety of vegetables daily. Corn is a good choice to help meet this nutritional requirement. Corn can help elevate macular pigment in the eye to help protect against macular degeneration. Corn is a good source of carbohydrates for food energy. It contains some Vitamin A (yellow corn only), minerals, and protein. One cooked ear (5 inches by 1¾ inches) contains 85 calories; 1 cup canned sweet corn (solids and liquid) provides 170 calories.

Preparation

  • Boiling is the most common method of cooking  corn. Place corn in enough unsalted cold water to cover. (Salt toughens corn.) Add 1 tablespoon sugar and 1 tablespoon lemon juice to each gal­lon of water, as desired. Heat to boiling, and boil uncovered 2 minutes. Remove from heat, and let corn stand about 10 minutes before serving. Season with butter, salt, and pepper.
  • Buttered—Allow 1 tablespoon butter per 2 to 3  cups cooked corn.
  • Creamed—Mix 1 cup medium white sauce with  2 cups cooked corn.
  • Scalloped—Arrange 2 cups of vegetables and 1  cup medium white sauce in alternate layers in a greased baking dish. Cover with buttered bread or cracker crumbs. Add 1/2 cup shredded ched­dar cheese into the sauce for extra flavor, variety, and food value.
  • Seasoned—Add basil, cayenne red pepper, celery • seed, chili powder, or rosemary.
  • Steamed—Arrange corn on steaming rack. Place • rack in steamer over 1 inch of water. Bring to boil. Cover and steam for 10 minutes or until corn is tender crisp. 

 

Nutrition

Serving Size 1/2 cup cooked (82g) Amount Per Serving % Daily Value

  • Calories 90
  • Calories from Fat 10
  • Total Fat 1g 2%
  • Saturated Fat 0g 0%
  • Cholesterol 0mg 0%
  • Sodium 15mg 1%
  • Total Carbohydrate 21g 7%
  • Dietary Fiber 2g 7%
  • Sugars 3g
  • Protein 3g
  • Vitamin A 0%
  • Vitamin C 8%
  • Calcium 0%
  • Iron 2%

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

Information adapted from http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/5000/pdf/5516.pdf

2016 Recipe

2016 Corn Recipe Card

If you would like to print a copy of this recipe, click here

2015 Recipe

If you would like to print a copy of this recipe, click here

2014 Recipe

If you would like to print a copy of this recipe, click here.

2013 Recipe

sweet corn chowder

If you would like to print a copy of this recipe, click here.

2012 Recipe

 corn salad 

 

 If you would like to print a copy of this recipe click here

Published in Partnerships
Tuesday, 22 May 2012 19:09

Recipe of the Week: Green Beans

Try a new recipe! The Wellness Consortium of Union County has partnered with Union County Farmer's Market to bring you information and healthy recipes that feature locally grown fruits and vegetables.

Vegetable of the Week: Green Beans

Selection:Green beans are high in vitamins A and C and are an excellent source of fiber. A cup of green beans is only 31 calories, making it a great choice as a side dish or snack. Picked
fried green beans 001mkwhile still immature, green beans are one of only a few varieties of beans that are eaten fresh. Although green beans vary in size they average about four inches in length. They are usually deep emerald green in color and come to a slight point at either end. They contain tiny seeds within their thin pods.  

Pick beans that are straight and slender. Beans should have a fresh, vivid color, velvety feel, and a firm texture. If you can see the seeds (beans) bulging in the pods, then they are over-mature. Over-mature beans will be tough, stringy and have a starchy taste. Avoid beans with rust spots and scars. When broken, beans should snap crisply.

Storage:

Always store beans in a cool place. To preserve green beans for future use, freeze or can them. Canning instructions are available from your local county Extension office. Small amounts of beans can be stored in a plastic bag in your refrigerator’s crisper drawer for up to 5 days.

Preparation:

Wash beans thoroughly in clear, cool water. Snap or trim the cap end off each bean. Leave the beans whole for cooking or snap or cut them crosswise into 1-to 2-inch lengths.

To Blanch or Boil: Wash and trim beans. Put beans in saucepan and cover with water. Remove beans and set side. Bring water to a boil, and drop beans, one handful at a time, into water so that the water continues to boil. Cook to the desired doneness, 3 to 8 minutes. Drain and serve while the beans are still crisp-tender, or add them to another dish for further cooking.

To Microwave: Place a pound of cut-up, washed and trimmed beans in a microwave dish with ¼ cup water. Cover and cook on high 5 to 10 minutes.

To Steam: Wash and trim beans. Bring an inch of water to a boil and place steamer basket with beans over the water. Cover and steam 3 to 7 minutes to desired tenderness.

To Stir-fry: Wash and cut beans into 2-inch lengths. Heat 1 teaspoon oil for every cup of beans. Stir-fry in hot oil 2 to 5 minutes. Remove from heat. If you wish, cover for a minute or so to reach

 2016 Recipe

2016 Green Bean Recipe Card 1

If you would like to print a copy of this recipe, click here

2015 Recipe

If you would like to print a copy of this recipe, click here

 

2014 Recipe

If you would like to print a copy of this recipe, click here.

 

2013 Recipe

minted green beans with red onion

If you would like to print a copy of this recipe, click here.

 

2012 Recipe

 Sensational Six-layer_dinner 

 

 If you would like to print a copy of this recipeclick here

Published in Partnerships
Tuesday, 22 May 2012 16:03

Recipe of the Week: Strawberries

Try a new recipe! The Wellness Consortium of Union County has partnered with Union County Farmer's Market to bring you information and healthy recipes that feature locally grown fruits and vegetables.

 

 FRUIT OF THE WEEK: Strawberries

Strawberries are a great no-fat, low calorie food.  In fact, a cup of Strawberries has only about 50 calories! Strawberries are an excellent source of Vitamin C.  A cup of strawberries has more Vitamin C than a cup of orange slices! Strawberries are also a good source of fiber (approx. 3 grams per cup), folate and potassium.  Fruits and vegetables that are high in potassium, eaten as part of a lower sodium diet, may help to significantly lower blood pressure. 

Selecting Berries at the Grocery:

    • Look for bright red berries with fresh green caps.  It is best to remove caps right before serving the berries. When caps are removed, they tear cells in the berries that release ascorbic acid oxidase, an enzyme that destroys Vitamin C.
    • Visually check each container to make sure there are no signs of mold growth. If one berry is molded, chances are that mold spores have traveled throughout the entire container.
    • When purchasing strawberries by the pound, one-and-a-half pounds equal one quart. This will yield about four cups of sliced strawberries.

Handling & Storage:

    • Use strawberries as soon after harvesting or purchasing as possible. Refrigerator storage does not improve the quality of fresh strawberries. Berries should not be left at room temperature for more than a few hours.
    • The pigments that make strawberries red are heat sensitive.  Warm temperatures will cause berries to turn brown. Strawberries also lose heat-sensitive Vitamin C during browning, heating and cooking.
    • Store unwashed berries loosely covered with plastic wrap in the coldest part of your refrigerator for two to three days at most. Do not wash berries until ready to use.
    • To wash, place berries in a colander and rinse under cold running water. Do not allow berries to set in water as they will lose color and flavor.
    • After washing, remove the green cap with a vegetable peeler or paring knife.  Be careful not to remove any of the fruit.

Info by: University of Illinois Extension, American Hear Association, Penn State Extension

 

2016 Recipe

2016 Strawberry Recipe Card

If you would like to print a copy of this recipe, click here

 2015 Recipe

2015 Recipe Card -Strawberry

If you would like to print a copy of this recipe, click here

 2014 Recipe

 

If you would like to print a copy of this recipe click here

 

 2013 Recipe

 Strawberry salsa_and_cinnamon_chips

 

 If you would like to print a copy of this recipeclick here

Published in Partnerships
Tuesday, 22 May 2012 15:55

Recipe of the Week: Spinach

Try a new recipe! The Wellness Consortium of Union County has partnered with Union County Farmer's Market to bring you information and healthy recipes that feature locally grown fruits and vegetables.

 

VEGETABLE OF THE WEEK: Spinach

Vegetable of the week: Spinach

Spinach growing in the garden is a welcome sign of spring. It is a source of Vitamin A. It is rich in iron, calcium and protein. Spinach can be grown as a spring and a fall crop. Crinkled leaved varieties tend to catch soil during rainfalls. Plant a plain leaved variety to avoid a "gritty" spinach when chewed.

Recommended Varieties

  • Crinkled-Leaf
  • Bloomsdale Long Standing
  • Winter Bloomsdale
  • Hybrid Savoy
  • Indian Summer
  • Melody
  • Tyee
  • Vienna
  • Plain-Leaf
  • Giant Nobel
  • Plain-Leaf Hybrid
  • Olympia

When to Plant:

The first planting can be made as soon as the soil is prepared in the spring. If the soil was prepared in the fall, seeds can be broadcast over frozen ground or snow cover in late winter and they will germinate as the soil thaws. Plant successive crops for several weeks after the initial sowing to keep the harvest going until hot weather. Seed spinach again in late summer for fall and early winter harvest. Chill seeds for summer or fall plantings in the refrigerator for 1 or 2 weeks before planting. In southern locations, immature spinach seedlings survive over winter on well-drained soils and resume growth in spring for early harvest. With mulch, borderline gardeners should be able to coax seedlings through the winter for an early spring harvest. Spinach can be grown in hotbeds, sunrooms or protected cold frames for winter salads.

Spacing & Depth:

Sow 12 to 15 seeds per foot of row. Cover 1/2 inch deep. When the plants are one inch tall, thin to 2 to 4 inches apart. Closer spacing (no thinning) is satisfactory when the entire plants are to be harvested. The rows may be as close as 12 inches apart, depending upon the method used for keeping weeds down. In beds, plants may be thinned to stand 4 to 6 inches apart in all directions. Little cultivation is necessary.

Care:

Spinach grows best with ample moisture and a fertile, well-drained soil. Under these conditions, no supplemental fertilizer is needed. If growth is slow or the plants are light green, side-dress with nitrogen fertilizer.

Harvesting:

The plants may be harvested whenever the leaves are large enough to use (a rosette of at least five or six leaves). Late thinnings may be harvested as whole plants and eaten. Cut the plants at or just below the soil surface. Spinach is of best quality if cut while young. Two or three separate seedings of short rows can provide harvest over an extended period. Some gardeners prefer to pick the outer leaves when they are 3 inches long and allow the younger leaves to develop for later harvest. Harvest the entire remaining crop when seed stalk formation begins because leaves quickly deteriorate as flowering begins.

Common Problems:

Cucumber mosaic virus causes a condition in spinach called blight. Downy mildew and other fungal leaf diseases are a problem, especially in seasons that are wet, humid or both. Some resistance is available through variety selection. Raised beds create excellent air and water drainage in the spinach bed, which also helps prevent infections.

Info by: University of Illinois Extension

 

2016 Recipe

2016 Spinach Recipe Card

If you would like to print a copy of this recipe, click here

2015 Recipe

2015 Recipe Card-Spinach 1

If you would like to print a copy of this recipe, click here

 2014 Recipe

2014 Recipe Card - Colorful Quesadillas - Spinach

If you would like to print a copy of this recipe, Click here

 2013 Recipe

 Turkey Pinwheel_appetizers_2012

    If you would like to print a copy of this recipe, Click here

 

 

Published in Partnerships

Try a new recipe! The Wellness Consortium of Union County has partnered with Union County Farmer's Market to bring you information and healthy recipes that feature locally grown fruits and vegetables.

 

VEGETABLE OF THE WEEK: Kale

 

History of Kale

 Kale has been cultivated for more than 2,000 years. Popular in Europe during Roman times and the Middle Ages, it arrived in the United States in the 17th century.

Kale belongs to the same family as cabbage, Brussels sprouts, and collards.   

 Kale chips are a nutritious, easy-to-make snack: Remove kale leaves from stems, tear into bite-sized pieces, drizzle with olive oil and a dash of salt, and bake 10 to 15 minutes in a 400°F oven.

 Kale is packed with antioxidants, which help neutralize harmful free radicals in the body. Some research suggests kale helps reduce the risk of certain cancers.

 One cup of chopped raw kale provides more than 100% of the daily value of vitamins A, C, and K.

Types of kale are differentiated by color (green, white, purple, or bluish green) and leaf shape.

 Kale contains lutein, a type of carotenoid (an organic pigment) responsible for the plant’s color and nutrients. Lutein helps keep eyes and vision healthy.

 2016 Recipe

2016 Kale Recipe Card

If you would like to print a copy of this recipe, click here

   2014 Recipe

 

 

If you would like to print a copy of this recipe, Click Here

 

 

   Fast Lane_Chow_Mein

 

 If you would like to print a copy of this recipe, Click Here

Published in Partnerships
Tuesday, 22 May 2012 14:32

Recipe of the Week: Beets

Try a new recipe! The Wellness Consortium of Union County has partnered with Union County Farmer's Market to bring you information and healthy recipes that feature locally grown fruits and vegetables.

Vegetable of the Week: Beets beets1

Fresh beets have a higher nutritive value than canned beets. Beets are low in calories, 44 calories for a 3/4 cup serving, and high in vitamin C and folate. Beets greens are also high in vitamin C, with 30 percent of the recommended daily allowance (in 1/2 cup cooked greens), and are high in vitamin A. Forty-six percent of a person’s daily requirement for vitamin A is contained in 1/2 cup of cooked greens.

Selection

Beets are available throughout the garden season. Early in the season, choose, from your garden or local farmer, the tender greens with small, immature beets (less than 1 1/2 inch in diameter). Beet greens are a delicacy and are cooked with the beet attached.   As the season progresses, look for medium-sized beets that are smooth, hard and have a deep red color. Larger beets, over 2 1/2 inches in diameter, may be tough, stringy and have a woody core. Avoid soft, bruised or shriveled beets.

Storage

Mature beets can be stored without the tops for up to three weeks in a plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper. Leave the beets unwashed when storing. When cutting tops from beets, leave at least 1/2 inch of the stems and at least two inches of the tap root on the beets. If you cut closer to the beet, the color will bleed from the vegetable during cooking. If the tops are tender and you want to use them, store them separately, and use as soon as possible.

Some favorite ways to serve beets are seasoned with herbs, pickled and in soups or salads.

Preparation 

Cut off leafy tops about one inch above the beet. Wash thoroughly in water to remove dirt and debris.

  • Baking or Roasting- Preheat oven to 400°F. Place unpeeled beets in a baking pan with a little oil, salt and pepper. Add 1/4 to 1/2 inch of water in the bottom of the pan and cover pan with foil. Bake for 45 to 90 minutes depending on size. Beets are done when a knife or fork can easily pierce the skin. Allow beets to cool slightly and peel off the skins by rubbing with your fingers. Slice, eat, and enjoy.
  • Microwave: One pound of small whole beets can be microwaved in 1/4 cup of liquid in 10 minutes.
  • Beets can be served warm or cold, sliced or whole, and are great with a little olive oil and lemon or with vinaigrette. Other great toppings include plain or flavored margarine, lemon juice, vinegar, sour cream, or plain yogurt. Beets are especially tasty with a little Balsamic Vinegar!

2016 Recipe

2016 Beet Recipe Card 1

If you would like a copy of this recipe, click here

2015 Recipe

If you would like a copy of this recipe, click here

2014 Recipe

2014 Recipe Card - Beet and Spinach Couscous - Beets

If you would like a copy of this recipe, click here.

 

2013 Recipe

beet and potato puree

If you would like to print a copy of this recipe, click here.

 

2012 Recipe 

  roasted root_vegetables_2012

 

 If you would like to print a copy of this recipe, click here

Published in Partnerships
Friday, 18 May 2012 15:19

Rhubarb

Try a new recipe! The Wellness Consortium of Union County has partnered with Union County Farmer's Market to bring you information and healthy recipes that feature locally grown fruits and vegetables.

     Featured Vegetable: Rhubarb

 

Rhubarb

Rhubarb is a perennial vegetable that grows well in most of the United States. Rhubarb is used in pies, tarts and sauces. Rhubarb should be planted at the end of one side of the garden where it will not be disturbed since it may be productive for five years or more. A half-dozen plants will provide enough rhubarb for a family of four.

 

Nutritional Value & Health Benefits

There are several different varieties of rhubarb grown all over the world and used in a variety of cooking preparations. One characteristic consistent with all rhubarb is the toxicity of the leaves and roots. The rhubarb leaves contain high amounts of oxalic acid, a toxic and potentially deadly poison. Only the stems are edible, although the first crops were grown for the round pouch of unopened flowers, which was cooked as a delicacy (in northern Asia it is still raised for this purpose). Nutritionally, it is low in calories and very acidic (pH 3.1). The acid is offset by the addition of sugar, which also increases the calorie count. Rhubarb is 95 percent water and has potassium and a modest amount of vitamin C. Although rhubarb can be tough and stringy, it does not contain a great deal of fiber, only 2 grams per cup. Unfortunately the high calcium content it supplies is bound by oxalic acid and so it is not easily absorbed by the body. Don't count on rhubarb as a source of dietary calcium.

 Nutrition Facts (1 cup diced, uncooked) Calories 26 Dietary Fiber 2 grams Protein 1 gram Carbohydrates 6 grams Vitamin C 10 mg Vitamin A 122 IU Folic Acid 8.7 mcg Calcium 105 mg Potassium 351 mg

Preparation & Serving

Rhubarb requires the addition of sugar to combat its extreme tartness. The early pink-stems seem to produce the best flavor for cooking. Rhubarb, or "the pie plant," is often considered a fruit, but it is actually a vegetable (leaf stem). It is prized for it's mouth-puckering tartness which adds zest to pies, tarts, cold soups, jam, and a host of other desserts. Many other flavors are flattered by the sourness of rhubarb. In the US it is most often teamed up with strawberries and baked into pies and tarts. A typical English preparation would use ginger, while the French may puree it into a sauce and serve it with fish. 

 
 

Rhubarb information from University of Illinois Extension.    

2016 Recipe

2016 Rhubarb Recipe Card

If you would like to print a copy of this recipe, click here

2015 Recipe

If you would like to print a copy of this recipe, click here

2014 recipe

 rhubarb crisp rc
If you would like to print a copy of this recipe, click here.

Rhubarb Pecan_Muffins_2012

 If you would like to print a copy of this recipe, click here

Published in Partnerships
Wednesday, 09 May 2012 17:15

Asparagus

Try a new recipe! The Wellness Consortium of Union County has partnered with Union County Farmer's Market to bring you information and healthy recipes that feature locally grown fruits and vegetables.

     Featured Vegetable:  Asparagus

 

Asparagus is one of the most nutritionally well-balanced vegetables in existence. It leads nearly all produce items in the wide array of nutrients it supplies in significant amounts for a healthy diet.

Asparagus is the leading supplier among vegetables of folic acid. A 5.3 ounce serving provides 60% of the recommended daily allowance for folacin which is necessary for blood cell formation, growth, and prevention of liver disease. Folacin has been shown to play a significant role in the prevention of neural tube defects, such as spina bifida, that cause paralysis and death in 2,500 babies each year. Its wealth of nutrients, fiber and very low sodium and calorie content make asparagus a nutritionally wise choice for today's health-conscious consumer.

asparagus nutrition information
Asparagus is:
  • Low in calories, only 20 per 5.3 oz. serving, less than 4 calories per spear.
  • Contains no fat or cholesterol.
  • Very low in sodium.
  • A good source of potassium.(1)
  • A source of fiber (3 grams per 5.3 oz. serving). (2)
  • An excellent source of folacin. (3)
  • A significant source of thiamin. (4)
  • A significant source of vitamin B6. (4)
  • One of the richest sources of rutin, a compound which strengthens capillary walls.
  • Contains glutathione (GSH). (5)
  • Asparagus information from  Michigan Asparagus Advisory Board at http://www.asparagus.com/maab/nutrition.html

    2016 Recipe

    2016 Asparagus Recipe Card

    If you would like to print a copy of this recipe, click here

    2015 Recipe

     If you would like to print a copy of this recipe, click here

     2014 Recipe

    If you would like to print a copy of this recipe, click here

    2013 Recipe

     asparagus rc

    If you would like to print a copy of this recipe, click here.

    2012 Recipe

    Asparagus Recipe

     If you would like to print a copy of this recipe, click here

    Published in Partnerships
    Wednesday, 10 August 2011 01:18

    Farmer's Market

    The Union County Health Department in collaboration with the Union County Wellness Consortium have annually created a series of recipe cards which highlight specific fruits and vegetables that are found weekly at our local Union County Farmer's Markets. Links below provide information on the nutritional value, storage tips, and the featured recipe. Hard copies of the recipes are available each Saturday morning at the Union County Farmer's Market in Marysville, Ohio. This market is open from 8a to 12p or until the farmer's run out of their product. In 2013, UCHD partnered with Wellness Consortium members, Honda of America and the Union County OSU Extension Services, for the recipes and printing of the cards. Collections of past year's recipes are also below. If you would more information about this project, please contact Doug Matthews at doug.matthews@uchd.net or 937-642-2053 ext. 2027. 

     

    Published in Partnerships
    Saturday, 06 August 2011 16:43

    Union County Wellness Consortium

    Grand Prix SeriesUCWC web version

    Operation Fit Kids

    5,4,3,2,1 Go

    Farmer's Market Recipe Cards

    To help your company with worksite wellness programming the Union County Health Department in collaboration with the Union County Chamber of Commerce and other private and public organizations formed the Union County Wellness Consortium dedicated to the promotion of health and wellness in Union County.

    Our vision and mission are as follows:

    Vision:  Supporting a culture of wellness for a healthy Union County.

    Mission: A community partnership building healthy habits to reduce the burden of disease in Union County through chronic disease prevention, resource development, and behavior change.

    Goals:

    • To prevent chronic disease through education and risk reduction
    • To serve as the primary wellness resource in Union County
    • To support behavior change in Union County by increasing accessibility to wellness opportunities and activities.

    The Consortium meets the first Wednesday of each month at 11 am (location varies each month)  to share success stories and resources in the area of worksite wellness. Each meeting provides a keynote presentation related to a specific wellness topic, local program highlight with practical application for other worksites, and a roundtable format for sharing and asking questions. For information on topic or location of meeting, please contact Lynnette Focht, Chairperson at  llfocht@mevsd.us or by phone 937-578-6130 or Doug Matthews, Secretary at doug.matthews@uchd.net or by phone at 937-642-2053 ext. 2027. 

    As a coalition, we strive to improve the opportunities for wellness in a variety of ways. Some of the current projects of the Consortium are; Union County Grand Prix Series, Operation Fit Kids, 5,4,3,2,1 Go!, and Farmers Market Recipe Cards.

    For more information about how the Wellness Consortium can assist your worksite or to attend an upcoming meeting, please contact 937-642-2053 ext. 2027.

    The Wellness Consortium is made of the following companies and organizations:

    • American Cancer Society
    • Buckeye Chiropractic
    • Cartridge World, Dublin
    • City of Marysville
    • Honda of America, Mfg.
    • Honda Marysville
    • Lowe's
    • LivinUp2 Fitness
    • Marysville Exempted School Distict
    • Marysville Public Library
    • Memorial Health / Memorial Hospital
    • Midwest Express Group
    • Moriroku Technology
    • Nestle PTC
    • North Union Local Schools
    • North Union-Richwood Public Library
    • Ohio Department of Health, Creating Healthy Communities
    • Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Corrections- Ohio Reformatory for Women
    • Ohio HighPoint/Marysville HS Health Tech Program
    • Preferred Benefits Services Agency, Inc.
    • Richwood Banking Company
    • Sumitomo Electric Wiring Systems
    • Union County
    • Union County Chamber of Commerce 
    • Union County Family YMCA
    • Union County Health Department
    • Union Rural Electric
    • Village of Richwood

     

     

     

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    gps cropped

    The Union County Grand Prix Series is a package of local, Union County, races. Individuals receive points based on participation and race results. Friendly competition is promoted throughout the series with a culminating event at series end. All races provide a community service through a philanthropic component.

    The Grand Prix Series went live as of Janaury 2012. Race directors will be promoting the Grand Series as well as sharing results with the committee. For more information, please contact Michelle Anderson- YMCA or Shawn Sech- UCHD or check us out on Facebook.

    Race (click for registration)

    2017 Date

    #StayActive 5K

    03/18/17

    Rock the Run 5K and 10K*

    04/22/17

    Marysville Neon Glow Run 5K

    06/10/17

    Richwood Sun Run

    06/17/17

    All Ohio Balloon Fest Race 5K

    08/04/17

    UCF Bike Ride*

    09/02/17

    Ruth Woods 5K

    09/16/17

    Plain City 4 Miler

    09/23/17

    United Way Honor Our Heroes Run Quarter Marathon and 5K*

    11/04/17

    Northwood 5K

    11/11/17

    Pumpkin Dash 5K

    11/23/17






















     

     

     

     

     

    *Indicates that this event will only receive 5 participation points, no placeholders points per age and gender category.

     

     2017 Race Series
    icon 2017 Grand Prix Series Flyer

    2017 Results
    icon Grand Prix Series- Northwoods
    icon Grand Prix Series- Honor Our Heroes
    icon Grand Prix Series- Plain City 4 Miler
    icon Grand Prix Series- Ruth Woods

    icon Grand Prix Series- UCF Bike Ride
    icon
     Grand Prix Series- All Ohio Balloon Fest
    icon Grand Prix Series- Sun Run
    icon
     Grand Prix Series- Neon Glow Run
    icon Grand Prix Series- Rock the Run
    icon Grand Prix Series- #StayActive

     

    2016 Race Series
    icon 2016 Grand Prix Series Flyer (includes race package information)

    2016 Results
    icon GPS thru 031616
    icon Grand Prix Series- Rock The Run
    icon Grand Prix Series- Neon Glow Run
    icon Grand Prix Series- Sun Run
    icon Grand Prix Series- Honda Run 4 Kids
    icon Grand Prix Series- Northwoods
    icon Grand Prix Series- Ruth Woods
    icon Grand Prix Series- Plain City 4 Miler
    icon Grand Prix Series- Honor Our Heroes
    icon Grand Prix Series- Pumpkin Dash and Final

    2015 Race Series

    icon 2015 Grand Prix Series Flyer

     2015 Race Results
    icon2015 Grand Prix Results- Pumpkin Dash

    icon 2015 Grand Prix Results- Honor Our Heroes
    icon 2015 Grand Prix Results- Plain City 4 Miler
    icon 2015 Grand Prix Results- Ruth Woods
    icon 2015 Grand Prix Results- AOBF
    icon 2015 Grand Prix Results- Run4Kids
    icon 2015 Grand Prix Results- Sun Run
    icon 2015 Grand Prix Results- Marysville Neon Glow
    icon 2015 GPS results- David Foster Race
    icon 2015 GPS results- Rock the Run

     

      

    2014 Race Series
    icon UCGPS 2014 Flyer

    2014 Race
    Results
    icon 2014 GPS Final Results (combined)
    icon 2014 GPS Final Results (female)
    icon 2014 GPS Final Results (male)
     

     

     2013 Race Results
    icon UCGPS results thru 120413

     

    2012 Grand Prix Series
    icon Grand Prix Series 2012 Flyer 

     2012 GPS Final Women's results-
    icon Womens Final Grand Prix Series Results

    2012 GPS Final Men's results-
    icon Mens Final Grand Prix Series Results

     


     

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    Operation Fit Kids

    We are on our way to an epidemic in childhood obesity.  The rates of childhood overweight have tripled nationally since the 1970s.  From genetics to unhealthy cultural norms to simply too many hours spent in front of a television instead of playing outside, there are seemingly endless factors that are contributing to the rapid spread of obesity.

    Operation Fit Kids was developed through a partnership between the Union County Family YMCA and Honda of America, Mfg / Watson Wellness Center in 2009. The program has been sustained by the YMCA. The six week program focusing on nutrition and physical activity is implemented in Union County schools with 3rd graders. The program has been successfully completed at; Edgewood, Northwood, Raymond, and Fairbanks.

    For more information, please contact Michelle Anderson at manderson@unioncountyymca.org or by phone at 937-578-4250.

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     5-4-3-2-1 Go

    We are on our way to an epidemic in childhood obesity.  The rates of childhood overweight have tripled nationally since the 1970s.  From genetics to unhealthy cultural norms to simply too many hours spent in front of a television instead of playing outside, there are seemingly endless factors that are contributing to the rapid spread of obesity.

    5-4-3-2-1 001So, what if a healthier lifestyle for a child was a simple as “5-4-3-2-1-Go!”?  The 5-4-3-2-1-Go! Program promotes the following:

     

    • 5 = 5 servings of fruits and vegetables per day
    • 4 = 4 servings of water
    • 3 = 3 servings of low fat dairy
    • 2 = 2 hours or less of screen time per day
    • 1 = 1 hour or more of physical activity per day

     

    The 5-4-3-2-1 Go! initiative was introduced to Union County in 2010 thanks to a grant Memorial Hospital received from the Ohio Hospital Association. In 2010, Memorial Hospital in collaboration with our Union County Wellness Consortium, implemented this program in 8 schools targeting 4th and 5th graders.

    5-4-3-2-1 020This simple but effective message is about teaching and reinforcing healthy lifestyle behaviors and promoting good health for ALL children, not just those who are obese or at risk for obesity.  The 5-4-3-2-1-Go! program is effective by using positive examples.  It takes away the focus on a child’s actual weight while reinforcing healthy daily behaviors, and effects changes in the child’s environment that support these behaviors. It also includes information for the whole family to assist in developing healthy behaviors and habits at home.

    We use trained high school teen leaders with adult supervision to promote these healthy lifestyle changes with the children. The teen-to-child approach is a unique and feasible way to deliver the healthy lifestyle message and has a positive effect on both the teen advocates and the children that they are interacting with.

    Since, 2010 we have added two parochial schools, and continued with current 4th graders each year. We currently offer the 5-4-3-2-1-GO! program to nine Union County Schools. The program is a 5 week program, each week being dedicated to one of the 5 lessons listed above. The program is FREE and typically takes place during recess. We end the program by throwing a celebration party at the Union County YMCA each spring, and open it up to all 5-4-3-2-1-GO! participants and their families.

    Through the program, we have seen significant improvement in the students who participated. At the end of the 5 week program, fruit and vegetable consumption improved by 32 percent, water and dairy consumption improved by 30 percent, screen time (described as the amount of time a child spends in front of a computer, television, video game, etc.) decreased by 22 percent, and physical activity levels improved by 25 percent.

    Armed with fruits and veggies, water, and lots of fun activities and incentives, the 5-4-3-2-1 Go! Take Off Union County program from Memorial Hospital is here to assist your 4th graders to learn healthy eating and exercise habits.

    For more information about this FREE healthy lifestyle program please feel free to contact Rebecca Wilder or Deb Stubbs at Memorial Hospital's Health Center, 937-578-2580. 

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    Walk with a Doc 

     

    Come join Memorial Health at Eljer Park for our Walk with A Doc program.


    Enjoy a nice walk hosted by a doctor on staff at Memorial Health, The Heart Partnership with 
    The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, or one of the Memorial Health’s physician practices. Exercise physiologists are also on-hand to offer free blood pressure checks and assist participants. A free healthy snack is included. We hope to see you there!

    Lace up your sneakers and bring any health questions you may have.


    TIME/LOCATION 
    Times and locations for walks are listed below.

    Date

    Time

    Location

    June 12, 2015

    8:00 a.m.

    Eljer Park

    June 25, 2015

    6:00 p.m.

    Eljer Park

    July 10, 2015

    8:00 a.m.

    Eljer Park

    July 23, 2015

    6:00 p.m.

    Eljer Park

    August 14, 2015

    8:00 a.m.

    Eljer Park

     


     

    Union County Farmers Market

    The Union County Health Department in collaboration with the Union County Wellness Consortium have annually created a series of recipe cards which highlight specific fruits and vegetables that are found weekly at our local Union County Farmer's Markets. Links below provides information on nutritional value, storage tips, and the featured recipe. Hard copies of the recipes are available each Saturday morning at the Union County Farmer's Market in Marysville, Ohio. This market is open from 8a to 12p or until the farmer's run out of product. In 2012, UCHD partnered with Wellness Consortium members, Honda of America and the Union County OSU Extension Services, for the recipes and printing of the cards. Collections of past year's recipes are also below. If you would more information about this project, please contact Brenda Rock at doug.matthews@uchd.net or 937-642-2053 ext. 2027. 

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    Published in Partnerships
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